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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Jacob Ward
Science and Technology Correspondent for Al Jazeera america and former editor-in-chief of Popular Science
ALJAZAM 01/28/2014
Ward: A new agreement with the Justice Department will allow internet companies to reveal how often they hand over customer data to the government for national security investigations. It puts an end to legal action filed by the companies. And as Jacob Ward reports, there are new concerns about how much personal information spy agencies can collect from popular smartphone apps.
Jacob Ward
Science and Technology Correspondent for Al Jazeera america and former editor-in-chief of Popular Science
ALJAZAM 01/28/2014
Ward: The documents that Edward Snowden turned over seemed to be revealing a whole new trove of information that the N.S.A. is making use of - namely the apps that you and I use every day. It seems that the kinds of information that those apps are really built to try to get out of you - your geographic location, the names of people in your photographs, the geotag and metadata that goes with those photographs, and really all the information that is generated when you email someone from within an app, thereby turning over your contact list to the app maker. All of that is suddenly available to the N.S.A. for scooping up.
Jacob Ward
Science and Technology Correspondent for Al Jazeera america and former editor-in-chief of Popular Science
ALJAZAM 01/28/2014
Ward: Now, there are a couple of apps that are specifically mentioned in these documents, a - the 2008 document mentions Google maps specifically because it is basically a great geo-locator. It can detect within a couple of feet of where you are standing and can as a result provide incredibly useful information to any sort of surveillance system. Now keep in mind that’s a 2008 version of Google maps. Since then the app has tremendously been improved. At this point, the map offers up the ability to identify where your home and your work are, which means that you'll be conveniently handing that kind of information over, and it also tracks your history over time such that you are not only understanding exactly where you are at that moment , but where you have been in the last month or so. So your past searches are stored, all kinds of useful information.
Jacob Ward
Science and Technology Correspondent for Al Jazeera america and former editor-in-chief of Popular Science
ALJAZAM 01/28/2014
Ward: Now keep in mind also that there has really been almost no sense yet of how impactly they’re using the data, just that they are collecting enormous amounts of it. And certainly in the private sector a lot of data comes in. But finding ways to make connections within that data, very very difficult to do, and so it's unclear at this point just how much data they’re actually able to make use of, even though we know they’re collecting incredible amounts of it. Drayton: Jake Ward in San Francisco. We should point out the popular game "Angry Birds" has been named in reports. Angry birds maker, Rovio, denies any knowledge of how spy agencies may have gained access to users personal information through it’s app.
Charlie Rose
Host of Charlie Rose and Co-Anchor of CBS This Morning
KPIX 01/28/2014
Rose: This morning we know who will lead the NSA, surveillance program. President Obama is choosing Vice Admiral Michael Rogers nominated to replace army General Chief Keith Alexander.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Wyden: So for purposes of trying to move this dialogue along, because I don't think this culture of misinformation is going to be easily fixed, I would like to get into several other areas where the government’s interpretation of the law is still unclear. Director Clapper, law-abiding Americans want to protect the privacy of their communications and I see a clear need to strengthen protections for information sent over the web or stored in the cloud.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Wyden: Declassified court documents show that in 2011 the NSA sought and obtained the authority to go through communications collected with respect to section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence and Surveillance Act and conduct warrantless searches for the communications of specific Americans. Can you tell us today whether any searches have ever been conducted? Clapper: Senator Wyden, I think at a threat hearing, this would – I would prefer not to discuss this and have this as a separate subject because there are very complex legal issues here that I just don't think is the appropriate time to discuss them. Wyden: When would that time be? I tried with written questions, Director Clapper, a year ago
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Wyden: to get answered. We were stonewalled on that in this committee can't do oversight if we can't get direct answers. When will you give the American people and unclassified answer to that question that relates directly to the privacy? Clapper: As soon as we can. Soon, I can Wyden: What would be wrong with 30 days? Clapper: That's fine.
James Comey
Director of the FBI
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Wyden: I would like to ask you about the government’s authority to track individuals using things like cell site location information and smart phone applications. Last fall the NSA Director testified that we, the NSA, identify a number, we could give that to the FBI. When they get their probable cause, then they can get the locational information they need. I’ve been asking the NSA to publicly clarify these remarks but it has not happened yet. So is the FBI required to have probable cause in order to acquire American’s cell site location information for intelligence purposes? Comey: I don’t believe so Senator. In almost all circumstances we have to obtain a court order but the showing is a reasonable basis to believe relevant to the investigation. Wyden: So you don’t have to show probable cause.
James Comey
Director of the FBI
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Wyden: So you don’t have to show probable cause. You have sited another. Is that standard different if the government is collecting the location information from a smart phone app rather than a cell phone tower? Comey: I don’t think I know. I probably ought to ask someone who is smarter on what the standard is that governs those. I don’t know the answer sitting here. Wyden: My time is up. Can I have an answer to that within a week? Comey: You sure can.
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